Language
Culture

Norwegian-British archaeology exhibition in East Yorkshire

 Date:16/03/2007 - 28/04/2007
 Type:Culture, Heritage
 Location:England, East Yorkshire

During the construction phase of the world’s longest underwater gas pipeline, Langeled, which goes from Norway to the UK, a number of significant archaeological artefacts were discovered that date back to the late Iron Age/Romano-British period. Norwegian company Gassco, responsible for bringing the gas to British shores, is now hosting an exhibition to display the artefacts in Beverely, East Yorkshire.

Since October 1, 2006 Norwegian company Gassco has been bringing much needed Norwegian gas to the UK via the Langeled pipeline which comes ashore in Easington, East Yorkshire. During the construction phase in 2003/2004, jewellery and flint tools were also found in addition to the discovery of that the site was once part of a wider burial ground.

To celebrate the finds, Gassco is organising an exhibition at Beverley’s Treasure House that tells the story of the Iron Age and Romano-British Period and the fascinating links that the East Riding of Yorkshire has with Norway, and in particular the country’s west coast.

Through illustrated panels, a short film, and actual examples of the type of artefacts discovered, the exhibition is a captivating and educational study of how the East Riding’s links with Norway date back hundreds of years.

Mr Kjell Varlo Larsen, information manager at Gassco said: “When we took over the management of the pipeline from Norsk Hydro, who managed the development and construction phase, we were keen to continue the excellent community work they had undertaken. This exhibition has historical and educational significance and we hope to attract local school children to the exhibition, particularly those from the Holderness area.”

Alan Moir, East Riding of Yorkshire Council’s libraries, arts and heritage group manager, said: “These recent discoveries continue to surprise and delight historians. The Holderness area has a fascinating history, and this exhibition highlights the uniqueness of the region. We are proud to host this exhibition at the Treasure House and I’m sure that visitors will be enlightened about the area. We are also pleased that the Norwegian Ambassador has accepted our invitation to open the exhibition.”

The Langeled Project Archaeological Exhibition will run for six weeks at the Treasure House, Champney Road, Beverley, during the following times:

Monday - 9.30am to 5.00pm
Tuesday - 9.30am to 8.00pm
Wednesday - 9.30am to 5.00pm
Thursday - 9.30am to 8.00pm
Friday - 9.30am to 5.00pm
Saturday - 9.00am to 4.00pm



Send this article to a friend  
Print version


A number of significant archaeological Iron Age/Romano-British period artefacts that were discovered during the construction phase of Langeled will go on display in East Yorkshire.

Norway - the official site in the UK / Contact the Embassy / Contact information
© 2003/2007